Sharing: How I get autistic accommodations (in White America)

Awesome post! I love the constructive, logical types of posts that explain the situation and offer real-life advice and make real-life statements/assessments about that situation. Visual Vox is the excellent writer of a fantastic blog! Definitely worth the read, and definitely worth following and checking regularly.  I love how her independent, non-biased mind works 🙂

(I’ll dress this up with tags and whatnot after work) ❤

Aspie Under Your Radar

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Updateautistsixjust raised an excellent point that this situation could be cultural. And I agree. It is cultural. It’s White All-American, not All-American in general. Let me fix that in the text below.

Woo hoo! I just checked my Social Security statement, and it looks like I won’t necessarily be destitute when I get to my 70s. Now, this is assuming there actually IS a U.S. Social Security Administration and money – which is not a safe assumption, these days.

But I’m pretending that all the money they’ve removed from me over the years is going to be there when I need it. Let’s just pretend. For the sake of taking the pressure off.

But enough about that. I want to share a little thing I learned about how to get accommodations for autistic myself, when things are rough with me.

I can get pretty marginal at times —…

View original post 884 more words

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2 Comments

  1. from the link i posted (in another thread, sorry)

    “I wish nobody became a psychiatrist, therapist, case worker or caregiver without having as much street training with autistic individuals of all ages as they did book learning.”

    obviously theyre never going to get that QUANTITY of training, but that *quality* of training is an “actionable item” or concrete goal that advocacy can push for (if not by law or by standard, then by just advocating that more and more clinicians get it. if they cant standardize the *requirement* they can standardize the *training* and then they can ask “have you taken “aspie-interaction training?” (just a probably non-offensive name for a start– it could be something else) “i havent.” “well thank you for your time, im going to look for someone who has.”

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Omg yes! 👏🏼👏🏼. Thank you for sharing this idea – it’s an awesome one! Yeah, what do textbooks do? Sure, they can be valuable, powerful tools of learning, but *only* if the material is correct and presented well. If it’s not accurate, all bets are off. It’s the textbook presentation that dissuaded me from realizing I had EDS (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, common among people on the spectrum), because the description was so out of touch and it only briefly mentioned the most extreme, obvious EDS presentation. In that situation, books worked against me (!). The *quality* of training is paramount, and a lack of real-life information (whether through experience or by reading more contemporary, accessible material) is paramount 💖🌟💖

      Liked by 1 person

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