70 of the absolute BEST #ActuallyAutistic blog posts I’ve ever read (300th post)

In the very first post on this blog and on my currently-pinned Twitter tweet, I state that “The Silent Wave”, on a grander scale, is not about me; it’s about all of us (especially those of us who are either recently diagnosed or otherwise adult-diagnosed on the Asperger’s/autism spectrum), as we find ourselves and chart a new route through the waters of life.

In my attempt to live up to that statement not just by saying it, but by following through with evidential action, I’ve tried to start a little informal tradition in which, every hundredth post or so, I write a post that hands over the megaphone from my loud mouth to the well-deserving voices.  These commemorative posts have actually become my favorite ones to write!

Today, for my 300th post, I’d like to celebrate (oh god, there’s so much to celebrate–the community, the feedback, the cohesion, the variance, the spectrum itself, etc, etc) by compiling a list of 70 posts by ActuallyAutistic blog-writers.  I really wanted to shoot for 100 posts, kind of like a Top 100, but technology and I don’t get along and it’s only a matter of time (and use) before my computer decides to slow to such a congested crawl that I can’t get the post written (lol).  (And besides, I didn’t want the post to take too long to load on y’all’s devices.) 🙂

But I know that by truncating the list at 70, I’m leaving out some really talented blog-writers out there.  That part genuinely bums me out.  However, never fear; I ain’t going anywhere any time soon, so please count on there being a 400th post in which more blogs and blog-writers get recognized!

I tried to choose posts that were informative, original (or at least among the first of their kind), particularly insightful, expressive, honest, and memorable.  I also tried to choose those that would have wide representation and appeal within the community–something we could read and most of us would say, “yeah!”  Or something we could learn from.  Or something we could nod and chuckle with.  Or something we could feel a kinship with.

The posts themselves are in no particular order, other than the grouping into loose categories.  Not alphabetical, not chronological, not merit/ranking, nor anything else.

Alrighty, enough with the small talk, self.  Let’s move 🙂

 

Some Asperger’s/autism basics:

 

Positive Vibes toward Asperger’s/autism:

 

The Asperger’s/autism spectrum community:

 

Asperger’s/autism discovery or diagnosis as an adult:

 

Communication conundrums:

 

Other Asperger’s/autistic traits:

 

Mental health/therapy aspects:

 

Disability / Different ability:

 

Activism (various topics – ableism, treatment/cures, acceptance, A$, etc):

 

And a shout-out to my newest blog-writing peeps!

 

This was TOTALLY fun to put together!  Each of the articles (and blogs) on this list (and also some that slipped my mind) are definitely worth bookmarking and following, if you’re not already.  (I have awesome taste in reading material, too 😉 )

Please know that this list is by NO means comprehensive.  I discover new blogs written by Aspie/autistic people every day, and it’s a labor of love to keep up with them all.

So, if you don’t see your blog on this list, please don’t despair!  Every so often I’ll write another tribute post.  I’m thinking that my 400th post will shine the spotlight on the blogs of the lovely writers who have been the most supportive, because I do owe y’all at least that much! 🙂

Happy reading and bookmarking!  I hope you enjoy the list 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

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41 Comments

    1. Absolutely, luv! My pleasure! Thank you so much for doing what you do; your writing is fantastic 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼😘❤️💞

      Like

  1. Reblogged this on Blinkie Frustrations and commented:
    This would probably be a good list of links for anyone interested in communication issues, accessibility, ASD or asperger, other disabilities etc.
    Don’t also forget disability issues can coexist, so one can be blind or deaf or deafblind and have asperger syndrome. Or just be a female person, and manage to try to fit in only to be accidentally discovered as an aspie in their fourties when their offspring gets diagnosed at an early age (and hopefully will get some support).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow, thank you for the reblog, from the bottom of my heart! I’m also partially deaf, which is actually going to be the topic of my next post 🙂 This beautiful intro serves as the clincher for me to write it! Thank you for being my inspiration ❤

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      1. Sweet 🙂
        I’m hearing (just moderate, annoying tinnitus) but i rely on hearing a lot because my ears work for things such as figuring where things are, for reading etc.
        It’s awesome to learn things from different perspectives, for instance i never realized how much many hard of hearing or deaf people use their sight for. Lipreading, getting all nonverbal cues from faces, expressions, body language etc magics.
        Meanwhile… whole it can be abnoying to tell around people about things such as not seeing and/or hearing, prosopagnosia etc, wouldn’t it be awesome if people were more open? If one in six (so I’ve read) has problems with hearing, if the others knew about that it would be easier to, well, accommodate and find better communication styles in person etc. way less stress of all the unnecessary stress factors

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I am deeply honored to be on your list, but in the interests of honesty I have to say that I am not #actually autistic. I am neurotypical, but the fiercely proud mother of an amazing autistic adult.
    Megan McLaughlin, of thatbloodycat.com.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for pointing that out, dear friend! I apologize for the error 😊 If it’s ok with you, the blog post (and the whole blog itself) is so awesome that do you mind if I keep it on the list but add an asterisk note that it’s not actually-autistic next to it (in the interests of integrity and transparency)? 😊❤️

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  3. Reblogged this on aspiblog and commented:
    Links to 70 splendid blog posts relating to autism. I have just been visiting, liking and where appropriate (i.e. anytime I am not already doing so) following the authors of these posts.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You do have a great site here, the information is fantastic. We have an adult son with several of these issues, my wife has been a great Mom as she has studied her behind off learning as much as she could and in teaching me many new things that I never had a clue on. Sites like this one I am sure can and will be great for many people and families. I am going to reblog this article for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow! Thank you for your lovely words 😊 I’m so honored to be able to help! Bravo to you and your wife – you are the best parents your son could wish for! That’s really awesome that you’re taking the time and effort to learn about our interesting world ❤️ Hats off to you 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

      Like

    1. Thank you, sister! Oh yeah, there’s a treasure trove of actually-autistic gems in there 👏🏼😊❤️

      Like

  5. Reblogged this on Mamautistic and commented:
    I don’t usually reblog – preferring to share things on Facebook and Twitter instead – but this is a treasure of resources and as we move towards mid-April, I’d like to boost more actually Autistic voices.

    Disclaimer: I’ve not read every single post on this list, but the ones I have read are wonderful and I’m planning to eventually read them all as I’m able to manage it 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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